Interactive White Board

Overview 

An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is a large interactive whiteboard display. IWBs are available as standalone touchscreen computer used independently to perform tasks and operations, or as connectable apparatus used as a touchpad to control computers from a projector. IWBs can replace many common classroom resources including: traditional whiteboards, flipcharts, DVD players, and TVs.

A study that consulted 174 teachers found that teachers believe that IWBs can be used to facilitate learning and instruction under the following conditions, 1) collaboration with colleagues, 2) training about effective instructional strategies using IWB, and 3) more frequent teacher use of IWBs to improve IWB competency (Turel &Johnson, 2012). From the other side of table, one review consulted over 600 students and found that many students thought that the interactive whiteboards make lessons more interesting and easier to understand, as they are more motivated to engage the material (Biró, 2011). However, they also complained about technical problems and their teachers’ inability to operate the boards (Biró, 2011). 

While there has been research that speaks to student and teacher perceptions of IWB, there has been no available research into IWBs as an assistive technology.

 

Research Rating: Due to the quasi-experimental nature of the information cited in this description this information is to be trusted as valid and reliable.

 

Advantages:

  • Can be used for multiple students.

 

Disadvantages:

  • Expensive

  • Need to be implemented by the school.

  • Often reserved for group instruction

Exact prices change frequently, which is why only approximate ranges are listed. 

$ - Under $5

$$ - Between $6 and $50

$$$ - Between $51 and $250

$$$$ - Over $250

References

Biró, P. (2011). STUDENTS AND THE INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARD. Acta Didactica Napocensia, 4(2/3), 29–38.

 

Turel, Y. K., & Johnson, T. E. (2012). Teachers' belief and use of interactive whiteboards for teaching and learning.Educational Technology & Society, 15(1), 381+.

Written by Harrison McNaughtan, Last Revision May 2018

Academic Intervention Lab

Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, Canada
     Email: academicinterventionlab@utoronto.ca

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